The Great Cake Mystery: Precious Ramotswe’s Very First Case

The Great Cake Mystery: Precious Ramotswe’s Very First Case

ISBN: 9780307743893
Publisher: Anchor Books (Penguin Random House)
Publication Date: first published 03 April 2012 by Anchor Books (Penguin Random House)

The first in the Young Precious Ramotswe series

In this delightful, enchanting tale for children, we find out how the young Precious became the crafty and intuitive private investigator we all know and love. When a piece of cake goes missing from her classroom, a traditionally built young boy is tagged as the culprit. Precious, however, is not convinced and sets out to find the real thief. But along the way she learns that your first guess isn’t always right.

Alexander McCall Smith’s sassy girl detective takes on a new dimension in this delightful children’s series.

Reviews

‘Enchanced by elegant woodcuts by Iain McIntosh, this would be a delightful story to read out to children or a classful’
The Sunday Times
“His fans will pluck it up like so many of his other books … A great read for young mystery addicts”
School Library Journal
“It is utterly charming and the illustrations are beautiful. A delightful book which is over all too soon”
Euro Crime
“A detective is born! What a delightful, breezy read!”
Mary Pope Osborne, bestselling author of The Magic Tree House series
“His fans will pluck it up like so many of his other books … A really fun read”
School Library Journal
“Bold and striking, McIntosh’s chunky, two-color woodcutlike pictures present evocative images of the African setting. This is a story, and a heroine, with impressive dimension”
Publishers Weekly

Excerpt

Have you ever said to yourself—not out loud, of course, but silently, just in your head: Wouldn’t it be nice to be a detective? I have, and so have a lot of other people, although most of us will never have the chance to make our dream come true. Detectives, you see, are born that way. Right from the beginning, they just know that this is what they want to…

Have you ever said to yourself—not out loud, of course, but silently, just in your head: Wouldn’t it be nice to be a detective? I have, and so have a lot of other people, although most of us will never have the chance to make our dream come true. Detectives, you see, are born that way. Right from the beginning, they just know that this is what they want to be. And right from the beginning, even when they are very young—a lot younger than you—they show that solving mysteries is something they can do rather well.

This is the story about a girl who became a detective. Her first name was Precious, and her second name was Ramotswe. That is an African name, and it is not as hard to say it as it looks. You just say RAM and then you say OTS (like lots without the l) and then you finish it off by saying WE. That’s it.